eCommerce: Why Cross-Selling Is an Important Element Beside Your Layout

The year 2016 presents tremendous opportunities for cross-selling techniques. eCommerce businesses can actually bolster sales records by even up to 30% by resorting to cross-selling. As a retailer, you do have the chance to generate extra traffic during the sales period by adding new features and optimizing user experience.

eCommerce: Strategies to Shore Up This Particular Technique

Cross-selling entails the practice of boosting sales by providing additional (but relevant) products along with the product the customer is already looking for. For instance, if a potential buyer is looking for a laptop then you can generally present them with the additional option of choosing laptop covers as well. While most may think that it's not that difficult to make a buyer shell out a few extra bucks for the cover when it's already buying a laptop- in reality, it's not that easy either. If it would have been that easy we would not really have taken the trouble to draw this primer up for you. So, do read on.

What you should know

Start off by shaking up your messaging techniques. No, we are not speaking about the stock-in-trade standard messages that are sent out in bulk to all your consumers during a sale or festivals. We are rather talking about personalizing your messages. Why not include the name of perspective within the message body itself? Notably, it has been found that the inclusion of the word "you" and "your" bolsters results by a significant margin. Your message should be more like you're speaking to your buyer right across the table.

It is very important to ensure that you're actually keeping your endeavors relevant. Like we have already pointed out that you can actually go on to offer something like a laptop cover with a laptop (or for that matter, a printer with a desktop). However, you just can not go on to present random products or accessories as cross sells. Presenting cross sells that will be needed without a doubt is a surefire tip to succeed. For instance, if you're selling a printer now, then putting printer ink along side is a more fruitful proposition rather than presenting a printer cover. A user may or may not make use of the cover but he / she has no other option but to use ink.

Now, you may not really believe it, but let us tell you even eCommerce website developers today focus a lot on this technique to aid their consumers to bolster their conversion odds. They can offer you insights regarding which cross sells pages to promote. In fact, there are eCommerce website developers who tell their clients how adopting cross-selling and up-selling measures count in your eCommerce success within an impressive layout does.

5 Ways to Better Investing

Being a better investor is a great way to minimize your risk when making investments and to ensure you’re making educated decisions. There are a few ways to become a better investor though and not everyone is cut out for the big leagues. That being said, what are some things you should know to become a better investor? Read on to find out.

# 1 – The first thing you should know about becoming better at investing is that constantly learning more and educating yourself is a fool-proof way of safe guarding yourself from major losses. This not only helps to keep you from making fatal mistakes but it also helps keep you from being taken advantage of by firms or brokers. If you’re brand new to investing it’s a good idea to read up on material that covers every aspect of investments on a basic level. For more advanced investors find an area where you’re most interested in and start there.

# 2 – Save as much of your money as possible. While this is not direct investment advice it will help to protect you from any major losses and help to cushion any blows you might suffer. Additionally, having the money in a safe spot where it is not dependent upon the stock market or other volatile markets is a great way to stay proactive.

# 3 – Watch out for stocks that can rise and drop suddenly and without very much warning. Going with stocks that have lower risk and long term gains is a great way to minimize your vulnerability with your investing decisions. Generally speaking the less volatile a particular stock is the better off you are in the long run.

# 4 – Try investing in things you have a personal interest in. If you’re into pushing forward green technology or a recent tech start up these might be great things for you to invest in and help support. Doing this not only gives you the peace of mind of knowing you’re supporting a good cause but if you’re truly passionate about it and believe in it there’s a good chance for long term returns.

# 5 – Diversify your investments-always! One of the most important things to do is to diversify as much as possible. In other words, do not put all your eggs in one basket. This will help to keep you protected from any major losses and will also increase performance overall if done properly.

A Short History of Sports Photography

The history of sports photography is tightly related to the trends of sport gaining popularity throughout human history. The technology of photography from the early 1800s onward leaped forward in bounds and aided an emerging media, sporting journalism.

The inspiration of athletics and sport in art can certainly be seen in the work of the ancient Greek masters of sculpture, however this type of expression was not as prevalent in modern sporting venues until the invention of wet-collodion and dry-plate photographic processes. These processes allowed for posed studio images on glass plates and tin-types, but were just not ‘fast’ enough for the ‘stop-action’ images we are used to seeing today.

As the 19th Century was coming to a close, in the 1880s scientific motion studies of athletes in action were produced in the United States and Germany, the technology was still not considered on the sporting field. This all changed with the advancement of photography and sports journals in the last part of the century. As the first sports journals began to appear around 1900, the public became more and more interested in the sports image, which often would include images of players on the tennis green, golfling or on the hunt for wild game.

In the history of sports photography the earliest of contributors were more concerned with the activities of the country elite, but by the end of World War I, readers of sporting journals were becoming interested in the professional athletes of American baseball and tennis. The majority of these early images were of prominent players in posed situations, giving te sense of action. Baseball players were posed with bat in hand at the plate, teams were lined up for group shots and so forth, however the ‘action’ shot was still not widely seen.

With the 1930s more and more images of athletes in action were appearing in magazines, assisted in their growth through camera systems allowing photographers shutter speeds up to 1/1000th of a second. This gave way to styles highlighting blurred subjects suggesting movement and ‘stop-action’ images of the athlete in activity. Photographers began adopting signature styles and the popularity of the genre began to grow rapidly as the public began to expect the excitement of seeing their favored athletes in ‘action.’

In 1954, Sports Illustrated – the vaunted digest of sports and athletics – premiered and suddenly the position of being a sports photographer became even more engrained in the public eye. The magazine highlighted the exploits and professional and amateur athletes the world over, increasing the need for the art form and those who practiced it. By this point, technology had more or less caught up with demand, with the advent of small, compact single lens reflex (SLR) cameras and the fast shutter speeds offered in the models. The history of sports photography is strongly tied to lens technology, as well, had advanced to offer the photographer a wide choice of methods to compress perspective and using depth of field for dramatic effect.

London Business Hotels

With London’s global position as one of the most significant cities in the World in terms of business and industry, it’s very important that London has a good level of quality accommodations for the many corporate visitors who travel to the capital on business trips through the year. Particularly with the City of London still maintaining its position as the centre of World finance, there are an abundance of overseas and domestic visitors needing the comfort and facilities of first class hotels in the city.

Since the days of the 70s when perhaps the Park Lane Hilton was seen as the place to stay when on a business trip to London, all the major international hotels have build hotels aimed at the business traveler in the city, in fact most hotel chains have numerous properties throughout the capital (Hilton Hotels now number 34 in total including the airports and the London outskirts!). Holiday Inn, Accor Hotels, Marriott Hotels and Thistle Hotels but to name a few, all have business hotels through London with a high level of comfort and a large range of facilities aimed mainly at the corporate traveler. New players to the London market also boast very good business hotels – H10 for example and the Park Plaza Hotel chain have gone out of their way to provide rooms suited for business people – the Park Plaza Westminster, for example, is an all suite hotel featuring rooms with a small lounge and kitchenette in addition to a generous sized bedroom and fabulous location close to Westminster Bridge. Privately owned up market hotels are also designed with corporate in mind – the Cadogan Hotel near Harrods department store and the Ritz Hotel in London’s Piccadilly street both provide not just good facilities and first class quality but also a discerning service for the more upmarket level of clients associated with such grand business hotels.

Rooms in all these type of hotels have the typical facilities you would expect such as desks with office type chairs, minibars, full room service and satellite TV programmes with pay movies and en suite facilities with a full complement of complimentary toiletries, heated towel rail and power showers (or ‘rain’ showers). Internet connectivity generally via Wifi is also a must nowadays with more and more hotels finding themselves forced through competition (and negative comments from guests) to providing this service free of charge. The business hotels provide the guests with excellent dining facilities – generally a full English breakfast and a choice of restaurants within the hotel for dinner at surprisingly reasonable prices. After a busy days doing business in the city, sometimes a good rewarding drink is required and the hotels accommodate well with their welcoming cocktail bars which, particularly during the happy hour period from 5 – 7pm, can be the place to be if you’re in the right hotel!